Domino Designer Java issues with FP9 ???

I installed Notes Feature Pack 9 on my Windows 10 laptop the other day and have been running into various fluky issues.  Some custom toolbar buttons stopped working, so I tried running the FP9 installer again to uninstall it.   Even though it says it’s uninstalling it, when I restart Notes it is still on FP9.

Just went to edit a Java agent, and it won’t even open in the editor.  Instead it tells me “Could not open the editor: Error – null.”

Trying to open an XPage custom control yesterday, and it was giving ClassPath errors.   Must be related to the newer version of Java.

Since, I work for a number of clients using different version of Domino, I have to keep everything compatible.

Unfortunately, I don’t have time to troubleshoot this further, and am going to have uninstall Notes and reinstall since the FP9 installer won’t roll back to a previous version.

Over the years, I’ve installed tons of new versions and fix packs.  Very seldom were there any issues, but not anymore.   Arg…

 

 

Advertisements

SOLUTION: Domino Server Setup Won’t Complete on Windows 2016

A quick note that may save admins some aggravation…

Today I installed an additional Domino 9.0.1 Server for one of my customers on a new VM with Windows Server 2016.

PROBLEM:  After a successful installation, the server setup gets to 20% complete and stops with the “Server not responding” error.

Normally, this means that the server does not have proper network connectivity to talk to the other Domino server (where it pulls a replica of the Domino Directory) — usually the firewall is not allowing Notes port 1352 traffic to pass  -OR-  the wrong IP address or server name was used.

But I ruled this out by installing and successfully setting up a Notes 9.0.1 Client — that worked to connect to the other server  — what the what ???

 

SOLUTION:   Install Feature Pack 8 before doing the setup —  FP8 now provides support for Windows Server 2016.     (I had installed Fix Pack 7, but still no dice.)

 

Frankly, I’ve gotten so used to the Domino server install & setup “just working” over the years with all the new Windows Server releases that I’ve gotten very lazy about reading release notes for required software versions.

Okay now I’m ready (MWLUG slides posted)

Just posted the slides for my session (AD108 Looking Into Vue.js) at www.synap.com  which I’ll be presenting on Thursday.

I’m batting clean-up  —  the last session of the last day and competing against Rob Novak’s ever-popular, “Free Beer’ session  (so, there may be an empty seat or two…                                                                                               hundred)

Feeling smug and prepared, bags packed, everything ready.  But we’ll see if the session is an easy ride or not.

As the boxing saying cautions:  “Everybody’s got a plan until they get punched in the face.”

Looking forward to seeing some old familiar faces and learning some cool new stuff this week!

Why You Should Go To MWLUG

If you’re not familiar with the MWLUG conference (http://www.mwlug.com), it is great conference to attend if you want to:

– get the maximum out of IBM collaboration software

-OR- integrate with the latest technologies

-OR- migrate away from Notes/Domino to other platforms

Because the sessions are given by the people on the cutting edge of all these areas.

 

It is an easy sell for your boss because it is essentially free to attend (a $75 donation is requested), and hotel rooms are $149/night.  I am a huge fan of MWLUG because it is a tremendous bargain for a conference full of highly technical information, with very little marketing fluff, and most of the speakers are the great ones that present at IBM’s larger conferences.  For me, 2 1/2 days with 3-4 tracks going on is just the perfect amount of technical info to attempt to absorb without my brain exploding (remember LotusSphere/IBM Connect with 12 simultaneous sessions over 5+ days).

 

Richard Moy and the whole MWLUG team (plus Richard’s family) do a tremendous job putting on a high-quality conference and perform a great service to our community!

 

PLUS…      <shameless promotion alert> I will be speaking at MWLUG this year.

My session is about the new JavaScript library/framework  vue.js

AD108 – Looking into Vue.js (through Domino goggles)

Thursday, August 10, 2017 | 03:00 PM – 03:45 PM | Plaza Ballroom 2

Vue.js is rightfully getting tremendous buzz because of its power, speed, and simplicity. It has been said that its developer, Evan You, has taken the best of Angular and React to create this new framework. But for a Domino web developer, this is a very different world. This talk will introduce the vue.js framework for building web applications and components, introducing the concepts and tools available. It will culminate in a hands-on where those with laptops can take it for a test drive.

MWLUG Session: Looking into Vue.js (through Domino goggles)

Looking forward to presenting a session at MWLUG 2017 in Washington, D.C.

Looking into Vue.js (through Domino goggles)

Vue.js is rightfully getting tremendous buzz because of its power, speed, and simplicity.  It has been said that its developer, Evan You, has taken the best of Angular and React to create this new framework.  But for a Domino web developer, this is a very different world. This talk will introduce the vue.js framework for building web applications and components, introducing the concepts and tools available.  It will culminate in a hands-on where those with laptops can take it for a test drive.

 

For anyone interested in attending, please let me know if you have any questions about vue.js that you would like addressed in the presentation.

For anyone else using vue.js with Domino, I’d love to hear about your experiences, tips, etc.

Like moving to a new house

Maybe not the greatest analogy, but when thinking about migrating Notes applications to a different platform it’s like when you are about to move to a new house…    that’s when you start to realize how many things you have accumulated over the years, bit by bit.  Much of which is stored away out of sight, that you had forgotten about that you own.  A lot of it is very useful, but a lot of it is pure junk, and no one knows why it’s been kept.

“What does this do and/or work with, anyway?” and “Who put this here and why was it left here?”   After figuring out what you’ve got, you have to decide if there’s room for it in the new place.  Maybe the new place doesn’t have anywhere you can put that appliance.      What will you have to leave behind and do without?    When you move it and put it in a new place will anyone be able to find it or will it be a mess in a new location?  Will all those things still work?

 

 

State of JavaScript Survey Results – what to learn next?

For those of us trying to navigate through all the web technologies and what to learn next, this survey is interesting – with a very good use of charts.  It shows how people responded about their awareness, their actual usage, and of those that had used a technology, their satisfaction / willingness to use again.

Additional charts show which other technologies are most likely used with each other.  For example with React they are likely to use ES6, Redux, Webpack).

State of JavaScript survey results

Just wish they had included Polymer.

 

MVC Analogy (ordering drinks at the bar)

 

As many of you may also be experiencing,  going from Notes dev and/or traditional web dev  to current web dev methods definitely involves a significant learning curve.   I’ve been reading some useful analogies at freecodecamp.com for topics like MVC, callbacks, closures, promises, etc.   Here are a few:

Model-View-Controller (MVC) Explained Through Ordering Drinks At The Bar

JavaScript Closures – Mailing a package

 

 

 

MWLUG 2016 – Worth the trip! and future directions

Thanks again to Richard Moy (plus his wife & family), the sponsors, and all the other MWLUG members for putting on an excellent conference. Those of us that attended greatly appreciate it, and I highly recommend attending next year if you have the opportunity.

It is always a pleasure to be around so many smart people that are doing very interesting projects. A lot has already been said about the general tone of the conference. We’re definitely living in some “interesting times”.

Unlike the past where a road map had been provided for us, I have a sense that we as a community will be helping each other figure out the new directions we travel.